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2013 Swing Trainers – {Buyer’s Guide}

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Intro

By: Matt Saternus

Last year I said that the Swing Trainer Shootout was The #1 Most Requested Review, even more than Rocketballz, and that may have been a stretch.  This year, it is not a stretch to say that the Swing Trainer Buyer's Guide is the single most in-demand review that MyGolfSpy has done.  Since the PGA Show in January, not a week has gone by that I haven’t gotten a comment, email, forum post, or tweet asking when it would be done.  And now, it’s finally here.

The Line Up

Last year we tested Golf Sense, Swing Byte, and Swing Smart.  This year, the field has more than doubled:

:: Swing Byte - Empower Your Golf Game with Real-Time Swing Data
:: Golf Sense - Analyze Your Stats. Get Real-Time Feedback. Improve Your Game
:: Swing Smart - Swing It, See It, Fix It
:: SwingTIP - The Shape of Swings to Come
:: Noitom MySwing - Your Personal Digital Swing
:: SkyPro - See, Groove, Improve
:: 3Bays GSA PUTT - Ultra Light & Ultra Small

An Important Note

Something that I came to appreciate only as I spent more and more time with these devices is that comparing them is not apples to apples.  To steal T's line, it's more like apples to Cheetos.  While all of these devices are small, digitial, and cool, they are not the same.  They don't have the same features and don't have similar user experiences.  On one hand, I wish they did: testing would be roughly 434,857 times easier.  On the other hand, the wide variety is really good for the consumer: you can find the device that delivers the kind of experience you want.

Ultimately, it was decided that declaring a "winner" was important, so we did, but just like with our Most Wanted Driver Test or Most Wanted Mallet Test, it is not necessarily true that the winner will be the best device for you.  I strongly encourage you to take a careful look at the all the information and ask yourself what you're looking for in a swing trainer before making your purchase.

How We Tested

All of the devices were tested by up to five different MyGolfSpy writers.  In addition to this field testing, I tested each device against FlightScope to judge the accuracy of the data that was produced.

Similar to last year, we have produced two charts.  The first gives some broad information about features, price, and compatibility.  The second gives you letter grades in each of four categories, plus an overall score.  Below, you will see full explanations of each grade for each device.

One area that I intentionally ignored was Price/Value.  Price may be a determining factor for some people, but I came to the conclusion that it was best to judge each device purely on what it does and let the individual consumer decide what was the best bang for their buck.

*Note: The overall score is not an average, simply a reflection of the overall quality of the device.

 

Physical Device: As far as the on-shaft devices, Swing Smart is the best.  It attaches under the shaft, so it’s barely noticeable at address, it’s tiny and lightweight, and it doesn’t twist.  The only real negative about it applies to all of the on-club devices: you need to move the device (or at least the sensor) when you change clubs.

App: The Swing Smart app hasn’t really changed since last year.  The layout is very simple and shows all you need to know on one screen.  The 3D image is still good.  Customizing your clubs and changing clubs during a session are both very easy.  It’s still the fastest app in terms of how quickly it puts numbers on the screen.  My one complaint is that the device times out very fast: I had to put the phone down and swing quickly or else the screen would shut off.  There may be a way to adjust this, but I didn’t find it.

Data: One of the things I like best about Swing Smart is that it doesn’t overwhelm the user with numbers.  Instead, it provides four easy to understand, actionable data points that are consistent and good.  Face to Path was consistently within 2-3 degrees of FlightScope and swing speed was consistently 2-3 MPH below what FlightScope reported.  The one thing that keeps the Data grade from being an "A" is the lack of a "Club Path" number.

Instruction: The app includes videos of Peter Kostis explaining the different numbers and offering some tips on how to change them.  While it’s a little light, the presentation is good and the information is pretty solid.  Most importantly, it's integrated into the app for easy access.

What's Unique: Training Mode - use the device without hitting a ball

What's Great: The most accurate 3D image.  The best on-club sensor.

What's Not: The look of the app.  Lack of club path number.

Overall: Swing Smart is the most refined device in this category.  Where others have added new features, Swing Smart has opted for perfecting the motion capture that powers the whole thing.  Swing Smart still has virtues that set it apart, training mode and ease of use to name two, but its competitors have cut that list down.  While Swing Smart is still in the discussion for the best device in this segment, it is not the first and last word in that discussion like it was last year.

Matt's Take: Swing Smart is a better-looking app and a Club Path number away from being a clear winner.  Everything that it does, it does very well.  I just want it to do a little more.  Regardless, if I had to make a blind recommendation of which device to buy, this would be it.

 

Physical Device: Swing Byte 2 is a major step forward from the original Swing Byte.  It is more secure on the club, doesn’t twist as easily, and is easier to align.  The only major negative about the physical device is that the lights which indicate on/off and Bluetooth connectivity are nearly invisible in the sunlight.

App: Swing Byte’s new app is, hands down, the class of the field.  It is the most feature-rich and the easiest to use.  There is never a time in using the app that you have to think, “How do I make it do ____?”  The video integration makes sense and doesn’t feel like an add-on.  The “Compare Swings” feature is the best in the field.

Note: I evaluated the new iPad app which differs from the app available for iPhone and Android at the time of publication.  I was told the Android tablet update is coming next, followed by iPhone and Android phone.

Data: While Swing Byte is up front about the fact that their device is not a mini-FlightScope, their device has improved immeasurably in terms of producing numbers that correlate with radar data.  Angle of Attack will always be steep because it is measured at a different point in the swing, but it’s now consistently within a 6* of FlightScope (not the case last year).  Club head speed was consistently within 3 MPH.  The Club Path and Face Angle to Path numbers were consistent, but they did show a draw bias of 2-3 degrees.  All in all, the data was consistent and very useable.

Instruction: At this time, Swing Byte doesn’t offer instruction.

What's Unique: Truly integrated video.

What's Great: The best "Compare Swings" feature on the market.  Lots of numbers.

What's Not: Nearly-invisible on/off lights.  Updated app not available on all platforms yet.  Lots of numbers.

Overall: Swing Byte 2 and the new iPad app are a giant leap forward, right into the first tier of digital swing trainers.  Between the improvements that I have already seen and the improvements that are on the way (using video to create a target-line reference for the data, essentially making it like FlightScope), I think that Swing Byte is one of the devices that you should consider purchasing.

Matt's Take: If you read last year's Swing Trainer review, you know that this is a complete 180 for me: I hated the original Swing Byte, I love Swing Byte 2.0.  From what I've seen, Swing Byte has the most potential of any device.  If the target-line feature is well implemented, it could revolutionize this product segment.  Swing Byte already has the best sizzle (presentation); if they get the steak (data) to match this device could be the undisputed champ.

 

Physical Device: This device is a close second to Swing Smart among on-club sensors.  It's very small, attaches easily, and stays put.  Aligning it on top of the club is recommended, but not required, though the white and orange are still plenty visible under the shaft.  I do have two complaints about the sensor: 1) it has to be re-calibrated every time you switch clubs (the process takes about 10-15 seconds) and 2) the range of the device (how close it must be to your phone) is not very good.  One interesting note: SkyPro does not have an on/off switch; it senses when a Bluetooth device is in range and powers itself on. 

App: For ease of use, this app is as good as any in the field.  It's intuitive and works easily.  It also has the single best new feature in this category: Groove.  This practice mode lets the user choose one metric (tempo or backswing length, for example), choose their target value (3:1 tempo, backswing that stops at parallel), and then try to "groove" that over 10 swings.  The golfer can win gold, silver, or bronze depending on how well they do.  The basic swing mode is good and golfers can set the device to give "Alerts" when it detects certain swing flaws.  I think the Plane mode is borderline pointless, but it doesn't hurt anything.

Data: Similar to Golf Sense, SkyPro does not produce many FlightScope-comparable numbers.  Club head speed is fairly accurate (lack of club customization hurts it in this respect) and shaft lean at impact (correlated to dynamic loft) is consistently good.  The other numbers that it produces are very consistent over time and were consistent with things I know that I do in my swing.  

Instruction: There are two ways to look at SkyPro's Instruction: on one hand, there is no information about how to, for example, create more shaft lean at impact.  From that perspective, it has no Instruction.  The other view is that SkyPro, through all of its various checkpoints and recommended values, has a lot of Instruction (all of the recommended values can be edited, but I don't anticipate many users doing so).  I take the second view.  While I am skeptical about a device prescribing how to swing, the values that are given are fairly middle-of-the-road and the ranges are wide enough to accommodate differing styles (and, again, they can be changed).  While I think the addition of a little "How To" would be good, I think that what SkyPro does offer is very useful.

What's Unique: Groove mode.

What's Great: Groove mode.  Very good sensor.

What's Not: Changing clubs is time consuming.  Plane Mode.

Overall: SkyPro is going to be the device that the average golfer connects with most easily.  Most golfers want to be told how to swing and SkyPro does that.  SkyPro also makes practice fun with Groove mode.  It's not a perfect device, nor a complete one, but what it does, it does very well, and it makes practice more fun.

Matt's Take: SkyPro has the single best feature (Groove Mode) and some of the worst (Plane Mode, Pro Data screen).  If it included some of the FlightScope-type numbers that Swing Smart and Swing Byte have, it could be a clear favorite in this category.  As it is, it ends up being a niche product for guys who want to be told how to swing.  Yes, there are ways to customize the swing so that it's not "one size fits all," but the average golfer does not have the knowledge to do that well.  Much like Swing Byte, SkyPro has huge upside and I'm excited to see how they improve going forward.

 

Physical Device: Hands down, the group’s favorite sensor.  Attach it to your glove and go; don’t worry about alignment or moving the sensor from club to club.  The only possible gripe is from people who don’t wear a glove, but I think that’s a fairly small minority.

App: The Golf Sense app just got a little nip and tuck for 2013, but it was an important one: all of the swing data is now seen on the main screen.  Additionally, the basic functionality of Golf Sense has improved: the connection is extremely stable and it displays swing data almost immediately after contact.  The 3D image is good, though I think many people might like it to be larger.

Data: As was discussed last year, Golf Sense measures very  different things than other devices.  The only FlightScope-comparable number that you get from Golf Sense is club head speed (consistently good, though it trends about 2 MPH slower than FlightScope).  The other data that is produced is consistent from device to device and over time, but is otherwise unverifiable.  That is not to say that it’s not useful: the speed graphs (club and hand) are very useful as is the backswing-length measurement.  Ultimately, it’s up to the individual golfer to decide if Golf Sense’s data will help them more than the FlightScope-like data from other devices.

Instruction: Golf Sense has started to introduce instructional pieces via their website.  So far, what they have created has been of very high quality.  My main complaint is that it’s not accessible via the app, and it’s buried on the website.  My hope is that more content will be created soon and that it will be featured in a more prominent location on the site and in the app.

What's Unique: On-glove sensor.  "Hand Path" 3D image.  Hip rotation measurement.

What's Great: Fast readings.  Easy to use.

What's Not: Lack of club data (face angle, path, etc).

Overall: Golf Sense is the most unique device in the field both for its sensor and the information it produces.  I think that some golfers will absolutely love the information Golf Sense produces, others will find it lacking compared to Swing Smart, Swing Byte, etc.  My advice is to look carefully at what Golf Sense has to offer and decide if its data points are the ones that you want.

Matt's Take: If you're someone who is already deeply involved in the FlightScope/Trackman world of club numbers, Golf Sense probably isn't going to be your device of choice.  However, for your average golfer who doesn't know, need, or want 53 numbers on their screen, Golf Sense's common sense metrics are a great alternative.

 

Physical Device: SwingTIP is the worst physical device in the field.  The locking mechanism, though sturdy looking, is prone to popping open on thin shots (to be clear, the device doesn’t fly away, it just springs open).  Additionally, it is one of the largest, most visible sensors at address.  On the positive, the on/off light is easy to read and the mounting clip includes a bar to aid in alignment.

App: SwingTIP has one of the easiest apps to use.  The menu choices are pared down and simple, much like the data that’s given.  All of the information is presented on one screen, and the analysis of each swing is easily accessed.  The 3D image is good, though some people will take issue with the image of the golfer that is presented since SwingTIP has no way to know what your body is doing on a given swing.  The swing analysis is decent, though occasionally you do get contradictory comments.  On the negative side, SwingTIP is the slowest device in terms of reporting swing data.  Additionally, the video integration feels like an afterthought: it doesn’t work together with any other elements of the app.

Data: Instead of giving players numbers, SwingTIP tells golfers if their club face was open, closed, or square and if their path was inside-out or outside-in (it does give numbers for tempo and club head speed).  Unfortunately, even with these “dumbed down” measures, SwingTIP misses the mark.  Club head speed, though spot on at times, was off by as much as 7 MPH on some swings.  I think a lot of this is can be attributed to the fact that the club cannot be "customized" in the app (i.e. the user cannot tell the app the club's length, shaft material, etc).  Club path was similarly erratic.  Face angle was simply inaccurate much of the time as was the “sweet spot” indicator.

Instruction: SwingTIP has the largest library of in-app instruction: 40 tips ranging from takeaway to generating more power.  Each tip consists of text and a video.  Overall, it’s a mixed bag: some of the tips are really good, some are weak.  Some of the videos are quite good (the ones by Jeff Ritter tend to be strong), some are not.  A lot of the tips tend to be more explanations of the “Analysis” than instruction, but that may be just as useful for golfers trying to dig their way out of the swing jargon.

What's Unique: Simplified data.  Loads of instructional material.

What's Great: Instruction is well integrated.  Easy to use app.

What's Not: Poor physical device.  Erratic data.

Overall: I appreciate the different approach that SwingTIP takes, eschewing numbers in favor of easier to understand terminology, but I found the accuracy lacking.  The amount of instruction, and the way it’s integrated, is something other devices should look to emulate, but ultimately SwingTIP is a second tier device.

Matt's Take: If the data were better, I could see myself recommending SwingTIP to lots of golfers who don't want to be "bogged down" by all the numbers.  Unfortunately, at this time, the data is so inconsistent that I can't suggest purchasing it.

 

Physical Device: 3Bays has one of the more unique approaches to this category: they plug their sensor into the butt of the grip.  I’m not sure if it twists on full swings (I don’t hit many 100 yard putts), but for putting this method was great.  The indicator light is super bright and the button is nice and sturdy.  Bonus: the device comes with a dedicated charger so you don’t have to plug it into your computer to power it up.  The only negative is that you need to hold the club perfectly still for a second before each stroke, something that may disrupt the rhythm of some golfers.

App: This app leaves me torn: I really like the look, the layout, the numbers, and some of the features, but I don’t find it particularly easy to use.  I kept asking myself, “How do I do ___ again?”.  I'm sure that feeling would go away over time, but, after seeing how intuitive other apps are, it's a definite negative.  One of the best things in the app is the graph of each data point: in one graph you can see, for each stroke you made in a practice session, what your tempo was (or club face, speed, etc).  This gives you a window into your overall consistency and miss patterns, which is really important information.

Data: While I wasn’t able to confirm the numbers with a SAM Puttlab, the data that 3Bays produced was consistent with what I have seen from Puttlab in the past.  Additionally, the data was consistent from device to device and over time.  Like all of these devices, the reference point for everything is the club face, so alignment correctly is critical.

Instruction: None at this time.

What's Unique: Some of the best data presentation graphics.

What's Great: Good numbers and graphic presentation.

What's Not: Putting and full swing in separate devices.  Being forced to stay perfectly still before your shot.

Overall: The 3Bays GSA PUTT is a really strong device in many ways: the sensor is small and light, the data is good and presented well.  As such, it earns its B+, as high a grade as any device in the field.  The app could be more intuitive, but that's not a major issue.  For some, the need to keep the sensor still before your stroke could be a deal breaker.

Matt's Take: Ultimately, 3Bays is just a little out of step with the rest of the market.  To get putting and full swing training, a 3Bays customer would have to spend $400 on two devices.  Swing Smart and Swing Byte offer full swing and putting in one device for $250 and $150, respectively.  There's nothing significant the 3Bays does better to justify that price and convenience difference.

 

Physical Device: Despite looking like a high school science fair project, the mySwing device is fairly good.  The combination of rubber shaft band and Velcro, while a pain to put on, holds the device in place quite well.  It’s very light weight, but it is a little bulky looking on top of the shaft.

App: Again, not the best looking, but it does the job.  The main display screen is crowded, but it does have all the things you need to see.  One feature I particularly like is the bar graph in the session review that shows how frequently you created various numbers (example: Face Angle was open 2* 4 times, open 1* 5 times, square 2 times).  The 3D image is very average.

Data: mySwing produced a mixed bag of data.  Club path was 3-4 degrees off, consistently.  Swing speed jumped from being within 2-3MPH to being off as much as 6MPH for stretches.  Dynamic loft and face angle were typically within 3 degrees.  Ultimately, the numbers produced were good, but not the best.

Instruction: The mySwing app provides three pages of suggestions/instruction.  The first is a chart with mySwing numbers for average, Tour, and Long Drive golfers.  This is helpful, and I would suggest all apps provide this.  The third page shows a few different 3D golf swing images and diagnoses what’s good or bad about them.  Again, very helpful.  The top half of the second page suggests that golfers aim for a 3:1 tempo (Tour Tempo), which I agree with.  You may be asking, “Why did they get a D- for instruction if all of this is ok?”  The problem lies on the bottom half of the second page (and elsewhere in the mySwing packaging/website) where they have a chart with the “old” (read: WRONG) Ballflight Laws.  In 2013, this is totally unacceptable.

What's Unique: Nothing.

What's Great: Nothing.

What's Not: The look of the app and the sensor.

Overall: mySwing is a device that I think 99% of golfers would dismiss because of the website, packaging, and look of the device...and that would be a shame because it’s actually quite decent.  It’s not among the best, but it’s not as bad as appearances would indicate.  It’s firmly in the second tier.

Matt's Take: I don't dislike mySwing, but it doesn't do anything unique or uniquely well.  If it cost $99, I would say that it's not a bad alternative for someone who's really price conscious.  Unfortunately, it carries the same price tag as Swing Byte which makes it very hard to recommend.

 

Conclusion

If you were too lazy to read everything I just wrote, here's the short version: there is a clear line between the Haves and Have-Nots in this category.  SwingByte, Swing Smart, SkyPro, and Golf Sense are the former, SwingTIP, mySwing, and 3Bays GSA Putt are the latter (in fairness, 3Bays GSA Putt is a good device, but it does half of what Swing Byte and Swing Smart do without being half the price).

In deciding between Swing Smart, Swing Byte, SkyPro, andGolf Sense, it comes down to what the user wants.  Each device offers something very different from the others.  Instructors and people who love Flightscope-esque number will gravitate towards Swing Byte.  People who want some numbers, but not too many will like Swing Smart or Golf Sense.  Golfers looking for specific swing instruction will want Sky Pro.

Just as with buying clubs, I would strongly recommend a trip to your local golf store to demo these devices before you buy.  Pro tip: Bring your own phone/tablet with the apps installed in advance (they're all free).

If you have any questions about any of these devices, please post a comment below, and I will do my best to answer it.  I will also be encouraging all of the manufacturers to keep an eye on the comments section, so feel free to direct questions to them as well.

{ 153 comments… read them below or add one }

GolfSense Jason July 8, 2013 at 10:16 am

Matt,
Thank you for taking the time to do these reviews. Should any of the readers have questions regarding GolfSense, we’ll do our best to answer them quickly.

Regards,
Jason

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Christian July 8, 2013 at 10:31 am

Math for the overall score ?!?!

The overall winner has no A grade, both SB2 and SkyPro have at least one Ax grade with more features on the sb2 side. How the heck did you calculate the overall score ?

From the grades the winner should to be SkyPro, right ?

P.S. I don’t own any of these items

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Matt Saternus July 8, 2013 at 11:08 am

There is no “math,” for the overall score. The overall score is not an average, simply a reflection of the overall quality of the device. That note seems to have been missed in the final edit, our apologies.

Matt

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Michael July 8, 2013 at 10:39 am

Did you test the putting facility on the Swingbyte and Swing Smart? If so how did they look against 3Bays?

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Matt Saternus July 8, 2013 at 11:09 am

Yes, those features were tested. SB and SS both look the same in putting mode as they do in full swing mode. The numbers produced by all three devices were similar.

Best,

Matt

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Alex with Swingbyte July 8, 2013 at 11:48 am

Matt,

Thanks for doing the work for the review. I’ll be happy to answer any SB/SB2 questions your readers may have.

Thanks,
Alex & the Swingbyte team.

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Danno July 10, 2013 at 10:28 am

Hi Alex, does Swingbyte have plans to add an Instruction feature? Thanks, Dan

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Alex with Swingbyte July 10, 2013 at 11:44 am

Hi Dan,

It’s something we’re definitely looking at. Our main goal is to help you improve faster, and we want to make sure that any instruction the app gives you does just that (and not the opposite!)

Thanks,
Alex.

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ron December 2, 2013 at 10:31 pm

I’m left handed. any issues with that?

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SwingSmart Angelo July 8, 2013 at 11:50 am

Thank you Matt and the testers at MyGolf Spy for including us in the 2013 Swing Trainer Buyer’s Guide. We look forward to answering any questions that might arise.

All the Best,

Angelo

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Magnus July 8, 2013 at 12:27 pm

Fantastic article.

Been waiting for this article for a long time. I’ve linked your article to my local golfshops asking if they are buying any of these gadgets and wether they have tested them.

I would really like to try the swingbyte 2, Golfsense and Skypro. I think the SmartSwing is a little bit too expensive compared to the others.
I’ve never used a flightscope nor a trackman so the Golfsense does look appealing aswell it does have good price and the best design (on the glove) but then again I want the numbers to be accurate and close to industry standard.

Thanks alot for the review.

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hckymeyer July 8, 2013 at 1:05 pm

I’ve never used one of these devices before, but do any of them have the ability to give reasonably accurate distances?

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Golfspy Matt July 8, 2013 at 1:12 pm

None of them measure the ball, so they can’t measure distance. Golf Sense does have a feature that, over time, learns to correlate certain clubs and speeds with distance. It’s pretty good if you “train” it a bit.

Best,

Matt

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dick July 8, 2013 at 2:16 pm

I haven’t had a chance to read the whole article yet, sorry I have to work for a living. But a couple quick thoughts. First the Swing Smart cross some value line for. I bought the 1st generation Swing Byte and enjoyed it so much that when they came out with an offer on the 2nd generation, I plunked down $100 for the new one.
When I researched prior to buying the Swing Byte, the issue of apples to apples comparability was noticed. I have been using the Swing Byte with an old version of a digital driving range. One of my pet peeves with Swing Byte is it does not project line of flight or probable distance. I recognize there is more data necessary to get an accurate flight and distance, but hey ballpark would be nice.
I will throw a plug in here for Swing Byte, their Customer Service has been extremely responsive. With the 1st generation I encountered a problem with the ipad app, they resolved the issue pronto and followed up to a definite conclusion. When I received the 2nd generation Swing Byte, the mounting clip broke, they promptly replaced it. All communications have been dealt with promptly and professionally (hats off to Shira).
I will compare features of all these devices and look to purchase something to augment the Swing Byte in the future, (who knows maybe the price will come down on the Swing Smart).
MSG – thanks for the outstanding articles.

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Mark Farkhan July 8, 2013 at 2:28 pm

Thank you Matt. I just returned my Skypro after a couple of weeks to Golfsmith. I had gotten it for $159 on sale with a coupon so it was a better deal than what you show. My only problem was that Skypro was showing my swing speed to be up to 10 mph greater than the swing analyzers at Golftec. Also, even though I got a nice graphical representation of my swing each time, I had no idea if it was good or not. Skypro would be useful if you had an instructor to get you to memorize your best swings (form and technique), then to use the practice and groove mode to duplicate. Without that data, it is not very useful as it doesn’t give you feedback as to what for example an ideal swing path may be.

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Wai July 8, 2013 at 2:33 pm

It’s crazy hot here in Arizona and tough to find time to go to the range.
Of these which one would be good for in home practice?
Which one can I use without hitting a ball?
Or maybe at least hitting the carpet?

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Alex with Swingbyte July 8, 2013 at 3:11 pm

Wai – you don’t have to be outside to use Swingbyte. You do need to make contact with something, but it can be just the carpet, or a foam ball.

Thanks,
Alex.

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Matt Saternus July 8, 2013 at 3:46 pm

Swing Smart has a training mode where you don’t need to hit anything, or you can use Swing Byte as Alex explained.

Matt

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Jack with Noitom mySwing July 9, 2013 at 10:15 am

You can use mySwing for in home practice and it will give you all the data when you brush the carpet.

Thanks,

Jack

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Stanley @3BaysGSA July 11, 2013 at 12:46 am

Hi Wai,

3BaysGSA PRO, swing analyzer can capture data without making any contact . It is perfect for “backyard” or indoor training, especially in the winter season or it is too hot out there.

Google “3BaysGSA” to learn more about us.
Thanks for the question and keep up the good work.

Stanley @3BaysGSA

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David Arakelian July 8, 2013 at 3:10 pm

Thank you!!

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Brad Smith July 8, 2013 at 3:13 pm

Matt (and Alex @ SwingByte)
Question regarding correlation with Flightscope data. With Swingbyte, you said it had significantly improved. You said that since Angle of Attack is measured at a different point , it will always be more steep, but it is now within 6 degrees of Flightscope. Do you mean it reads 6 degrees steeper, or do you mean that if flightscope reads 0 degrees, that Swingbyte reads somewhere between minus 6 and plus 6? In either case, how is this data of any possible use??
Brad

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Matt Saternus July 8, 2013 at 3:44 pm

Brad,

Good question. As it was explained to me, Swing Byte measures AoA earlier in the swing than Flightscope or Trackman. As such, SBs reading is always steeper. When FS reads 0, SB usually reads 6 down. If you know that, I think it could be very useful.

Best,

Matt

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Alex with Swingbyte July 8, 2013 at 11:21 pm

That’s exactly right, Matt. While the numbers are always steeper (by about the same amount), they are directionally consistent – so a steeper AoA on FS or TrackMan will also translate to a steeper AoA on Swingbyte, which SB owners find helpful.

Thanks,
Alex.

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Rick July 8, 2013 at 3:45 pm

Thanks for the article and comprehensive reviews. I’ve been waiting for someone to do a comparative review of all these devices in a single article almost as long as I’ve been waiting for the Android versions to come out. I’d like to offer that both SwingSmart and SwingByte have been very open and responsive to inquiries and hope that translates the same for support. Whichever decisions are made, I do agree that these devices will change the way golfers practice and allow us to really see into our swings. Not sure if that should be rated good or bad.

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joemoma July 8, 2013 at 4:02 pm

3 bays has a putting unit and a full swing unit…. how come you only chose one for the review?

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Matt Saternus July 8, 2013 at 4:07 pm

It wasn’t a choice. 3Bays stood us they are revamping their full swing trainer and it wouldn’t be ready in time for the review.

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joemoma July 9, 2013 at 12:00 pm

Thank you.

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Stanley @3BaysGSA July 9, 2013 at 5:12 am

We recently added the Auto Video Recording feature onto our swing analyzer. This feature allows golfers to automatically video record their body posture from any angle in conjunction with metrics and club path animation. The feedback on this combination of video analysis and club analysis is overwhelming. Please visit our website for more information.

We feel sorry that the swing analyzer cannot catch up the shootout in time. We hope it can be reviewed in near future.

Stanley @3BaysGSA

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Erik July 8, 2013 at 4:12 pm

Had 2 Swing Smart’s both broke within a week, Angelo promised me a new one at a discounted price. Never received what I was promised. So I bought a SkyPro which works fabulously and never looked back.

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Ben Martin July 8, 2013 at 4:51 pm

Hi,

I enjoyed the article thank you.

The question I would like to ask you is. Which device would you recommend purely for swing plane graphics especially the follow through?

Thanks in advance.

Ben

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Matt Saternus July 8, 2013 at 7:14 pm

Ben,

I would go with Swing Smart or Swing Byte. Swing Byte gives you unlimited freedom to move the image around, Swing Smart moves you through a few different “camera” positions. The freedom can be nice, but I think most people are probably just looking for the basics: down the line, face on, etc.

Also, you can download both apps for free and look at the demo swings to see which system you prefer.

Best,

Matt

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joemoma July 9, 2013 at 12:03 pm

Swing Smart is also the only unit that provides feedback on both the full swing and putting.

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Alex with Swingbyte July 9, 2013 at 1:43 pm

Joe,

Swingbyte captures both full swing and putting.

Thanks,
Alex.

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joemoma July 9, 2013 at 2:24 pm

What?! I did not know that. Thanks for the heads up.

aaron July 8, 2013 at 7:54 pm

Just a quick question I read last years and this year’s reviews. Excellent job with both of them. My question is simple are these products helpful and worth buying do they really help? Or would I be better off joinning a club that has track man for example and using their trackman instead of this technology? Are these more like a toy you only use a couple times or do you find yourself using them daily

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Matt Saternus July 8, 2013 at 11:21 pm

Aaron,

You win the award for “Question of the Day.” Your prize: a really long answer.

Let’s start with this: neither Trackman, Flightscope, nor any of these products are going to “make you better.” Give the average golfer a Trackman and it won’t matter a bit: he won’t understand the numbers let alone what to do about them (he also doesn’t practice enough or in any meaningful way, but that’s another story). The same could be said about some/all of the devices in this shootout.

I can say definitively that these devices are not toys; they are serious pieces of technology that could absolutely be part of a serious improvement plan.

In determining what technology you want to use, I would consider some questions: Are you going to have an instructor? What technology is he/she familiar with? Are you teaching yourself? What technology are you familiar with? What data points do you want or think are important?

I would place a high premium on using technology that my instructor is familiar with as it will help you get more out of your time with him. If you’re teaching yourself, then only you know what data you want/need, so choose your technology accordingly.

Hope that helps. Feel free to shoot any follow up questions my way.

Best,

Matt

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GarnetinOZ July 8, 2013 at 11:53 pm

Matt and Aaron,
I have had a GolfSense since Xmas 2012 (generous sister) and use it in conjunction with lessons and regular range practice (weekly / fortnightly). I find that it is great to be able to work on something and ‘see’ that you are improving or being more consistent. discussing with your pro what the result should be like means that you are practicing the right things even when he isn’t around to stand behind you and correct your errors. It has been great for improving my back-swing position, which has resulted in greater hand and club speed and tempo. I never realised how ‘compact’ my swing was before using this device.
Overall it really helps me to practice with a plan and have a much better idea of when I am getting it right and wrong.
Cheers
Garnet

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Mike September 1, 2013 at 4:11 pm

I got a kick out of your “average golfer” comments regarding practice etc. I’m probably a below average golfer and I’ve been looking at these devices to correct my “over the top” golf swing.

Would any of these devices help to show me when I do or don’t swing over the top?

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Leek July 8, 2013 at 8:10 pm

Thank you for all of the work, thought and time committed to this buying guide.

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Rojo July 8, 2013 at 8:21 pm

Hi. Great review, very informative and useful (at least to me). One question… you gave SB2 a B on Data, and Skypro an A-, yet when I read the reviews of each device, they read like the SB2 has better data (i.e. more of it, and Flightscope comparable), while Skypro has less data and no FS comparable data. I am confused by that.

Thanks again
RJ

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Matt Saternus July 8, 2013 at 11:28 pm

RJ,

Your questions touches on why this is such a hard piece to write: it’s not apples to apples. The Data grade is not based on who gives the most FS-comparable numbers, but rather Quantity (more is not always better), Quality, and Consistency.

SkyPro has very little FS-comparable data, but it has lots of other Data (club face and club position at various checkpoints) that is very accurate. I felt that the Quantity was appropriate (it was all usable) and the Quality and Consistency were very good.

Swing Byte produces tons of FS-comparable data. This is a double-edged sword in this contest because it offers more potential to be wrong and it brings in the possibility of information-overload. My determination was that the Quality and Consistency of the Data was good, but not great, and the Quantity was actually too high (new features may ameliorate this in the future).

I hope that clears things up.

Best,

Matt

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Rojo July 9, 2013 at 9:57 pm

Thanks for the explanation! It’s much appreciated. One further question. I work with a golf instructor who uses the Flightscope in our coaching sessions. I’ve been considering buying one of these units to use while I practice on my own when I don’t have access to the Flightscope. For my specific case would I be better off using the SB2 which has FS comparable numbers? I really don’t need a unit that tells me how I should swing. I already have a swing, I’m just trying to refine it for consistency.

Thanks again,
RJ

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Matt Saternus July 10, 2013 at 3:06 pm

RJ,

If you’re looking for the best FlightScope-comparable numbers, you will want Swing Byte or Swing Smart. Swing Byte produces a lot more numbers, so depending on what numbers you want to work on, that would be your best choice.

Best,

Matt

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Rojo July 10, 2013 at 6:27 pm

Thanks for the feedback. Keep up the great work! :)

RJ

Gary Davis July 8, 2013 at 11:51 pm

Great survey on these devices.—Thank you

Are any useable by lefthanders??

Gary

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Jack with Noitom mySwing July 9, 2013 at 10:21 am

Gary,

mySwing has an option for lefthanders.

Thanks,

Jack

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Stephane Gauthier July 9, 2013 at 7:31 pm

Crap. I just ordered a SwingByte2 and that question now makes me wonder about that.
I’m a righthanded leftie like Phil Mickelson.
Does swingbyte2 supports both sides? And if so, does the graphics and data adjust accordingly? if no I’ll have to cancel.

Thanks,
Steph

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Alex with Swingbyte July 10, 2013 at 12:48 am

Hi Stephane,

SB2 works for lefties same as righties, and unlike SB1, you don’t even have to attach it differently – it automatically detects the type of swing and adjusts the graphics accordingly.

Thanks,
Alex.

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Stanley @3BaysGSA July 9, 2013 at 9:53 pm

Hi Gary,

3BaysGSA supports both sides and it’s all automatic. Graphics and data adjust accordingly and automatically.

Best,
Stanley @3BaysGSA

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Stanley @3BaysGSA July 9, 2013 at 4:42 am

Hi readers
We’ll be happy to answer any questions regarding our products. Feel free to raise any question, we’ll do the best to answer as quickly as possible.

A big thank to Matt for an awesome review on 3BaysGSA PUTT

Thanks
Stanley & 3BaysGSA team

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SwingSmart Angelo July 9, 2013 at 9:48 am

Hi Gary,

Yes, we do work for left handers. It’s automatic. Just make a swing or a putt and the 3D animation will switch to a left handed setup. The head of our Research and Development, Ted, is a lefty so the first swing ever captured by a SwingSmart was from the left side.

All the Best,

The SwingSmart Team

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Mu Ah July 9, 2013 at 10:26 am

So, I am seeing an announcement for the SwingSmart DUO this morning… Is that a different, newer, better device than the version reviewed here? Does it address some of the flaws of the overall winner and make it the perfect device?

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SwingSmart Angelo July 9, 2013 at 12:31 pm

Hi Mu Ah,

The SwingSmart Duo is the next evolution of our patented motion capture technology. It is a newer version of the system that was tested here. As Matt wrote, our goal is to keep perfecting the motion capture engine that powers our device. The Duo is the culmination of our effort to reach that goal. It features our HiQ technology that gives golfers greater accuracy and consistency for their captured swings. HiQ offers this advantage by refining the system on every individual swing to assure an accurate and repeatable result – all without any involvement from the golfer. The Duo is available for devices using both Apple and Android operating systems.

All the Best,

The SwingSmart Team

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dh00100 July 9, 2013 at 7:20 pm

Matt – thanks for the follow up eval – very useful for someone who has been tracking this market (and waiting for android apps) for a long time now….

Angelo -
Can you please clarify what the Duo is? A new generation of the device, app or both?
Is it providing any additional information, or more accurate versions of the existing info?
Is the old device compatible with the android app?

Thanks,

DH

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GolfSense Jason July 9, 2013 at 9:55 pm

GolfSense also supports both Right and Left handed users with corresponding graphics. GolfSense all supports Android.

Thank you!

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BillyTee July 9, 2013 at 10:09 pm

Being from Australia I’m interested to know from the company reps which of these trainers are available here? If not what are your plans and or timframes to bring them here? Or what sort of support can I expect if I buy online from the US if there is a problem?

Thanks

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Alex with Swingbyte July 10, 2013 at 12:49 am

Billy,

Swingbyte is available for online purchase through a number of resellers with delivery to Australia. We support our product no matter what country you’re in, so you’ll get full access to our support staff regardless of where you are and the benefit of our full warranty.

Thanks,
Alex.

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Stanley @3BaysGSA July 11, 2013 at 12:39 am

Hi Billy,

3BaysGSA putting and swing analyzers are now available in GolfBox and House Of Golf @Australia. Welcome to stop by their stores to see a demo. Feel free to check out more details on our official website. ( Google “3BaysGSA” )

Best
Stanley @ 3BaysGSA

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GolfSense Jason July 9, 2013 at 10:14 pm
A.C.Grant July 9, 2013 at 11:35 pm

I am curious why 3Bays have 2 separate device. After reading this article, it is not far fetched to say that they would rank in the top tier along with Swingbyte and SwingSmart if they had integrated the two. The grading seems like they belong in the same tier, but they are not because of this.

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Stanley @3BaysGSA July 11, 2013 at 12:54 am

Hi A.C.Grant,

The full swing and putting are actually two different natures of motions.
As a result, we deployed different motion sensors and optimized our algorithm for data capture.
Our 3BaysGSA PUTT are specially designed for putting measurement. With the sophisticated engineering on hardware and algorithm, it can detect the putting stroke in fine detail with reliable accuracy.
We are proud of the product and expect it can be competitive to any other putting analyzers in the market.
If you are struggling with your putting game, we strongly recommend you try out 3BaysGSA PUTT.

Thanks for the great question.
Stanley @3BaysGSA

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SwingSmart Angelo July 9, 2013 at 11:45 pm

Hi DH,

The Duo is the next generation of the device. The App will look the same to the golfer, but there is a lot of work going on “behind the scenes” in the App. When we decided to work on bringing our Android App to the market, we decided that we wanted to do more than just make the sensor Droid compatible, we wanted to take our motion capture to the next level. So now, every time you swing, the Duo employs a patent-pending algorithm that adapts to each golfer’s swing to faithfully measure their drives, chips and putts. It is providing tempo, face angle versus address, swing speed, shaft lean, and face angle versus the path. The Duo is our first model to be compatible with Android.

Please email us at [email protected] if you would like to discuss it further.

All the Best,

The SwingSmart Team

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Adam Tsouras July 10, 2013 at 12:58 am

Hi everyone,

Adam here from SkyPro. Thanks to Matt and the MyGolf Spy team for doing a fantastic job on this Swing Trainer Review. I would be more than happy to answer any questions anyone may have regarding the SkyPro product.

Thanks!
-Adam

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DH00100 July 10, 2013 at 11:03 pm

Hi Adam,

The question that i, and i assume many others would like answered is a definitve postion on the support for android – skypro is notably unique in their lack of support.
As referenced online, android will be supported in March or in the spring, or in June, or they are thinking about it or it will never be supported. The response from your support group suggests that it will not be supported any time soon.

Can you please clarify this – will you support android, and if so, when? This will allow all of us android users who have been been putting off a purchase to now make a decision.

Thanks for your help,
DH

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Adam Tsouras July 11, 2013 at 2:11 am

Hi DH,

That’s a great question, and I apologize for the confusion thus far. I want to be as honest as possible, so you’ll have to forgive me for the considerable response.

Providing you with top quality software, hardware and overall experience is our top priority. For us, this means listening to the customer and incorporating your suggestions into the product. We do all of our development in-house, which allows us to act quickly on this feedback. In fact, we just released an app update (version 1.3) which integrated eight new features based wholly on our first month of customer feedback.

Unfortunately this means we haven’t devoted as much time to the Android app as we would have liked. A high quality port is a big job, and for an app like SkyPro it takes a lot of time (our estimate is a few thousand hours.) While I wish we could have an Android app ready for you tomorrow, in reality the release date is going to be in the order of months, not weeks. For those of you who can’t wait any longer, I hope that provides you with some guidance.

The Android platform is very important to us. We’re certainly working on it, and I look forward to bringing you a quality experience when it’s ready.

- Adam

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Patric Lindström July 18, 2013 at 2:59 am

Hi Adam,

I saw a presentation of SkyPro and really liked the user interface!

I am wondering if SkyPro are looking into adding more FS-like measurements in a software upgrade or if this is a limit in the hardware?

Regards Patric

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George March 22, 2014 at 6:05 pm

I just received my SkyPro today. I didn’t do much research prior to getting it and after a quick search thought SkyPro would be fine. I purchased it from Buydig after reading on their ebay page ” transmitted wirelessly to your smartphone or tablet, ” After unpacking it, noted on the box, “required.. i-phone or i-pad..” Since I only have android cell and tablet, I realized I should have done a bit more research before buying. (why I am here now!) Anyway… should I return unit or wait for what is reported on your website, “Android version coming soon”??
Thanks,
George

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Vincent Chan July 10, 2013 at 4:07 am

Hi Stanley with 3Bays,

Can you tell me why you guys have different devices for putting and full swing? Matt did raise a good point here.

Thanks!

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Stanley @3BaysGSA July 11, 2013 at 2:25 am

Hi Vincent,

The full swing and putting are actually two different natures of motions.
As a result, we deployed different motion sensors and optimized our algorithm for data capture.
Our 3BaysGSA PUTT are specially designed for putting measurement. With the sophisticated engineering on hardware and algorithm, it can detect the putting stroke in fine detail with reliable accuracy.
We are proud of the product and expect it can be competitive to any other putting analyzers in the market.
If you are struggling with your putting game, we strongly recommend you try out 3BaysGSA PUTT.

Thanks for the great question.
Stanley @3BaysGSA

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Golfox July 10, 2013 at 9:37 am

Will the SwingSmart software be updated relatively soon to address the lack of a club path number as outlined in the review.

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SwingSmart Angelo July 10, 2013 at 1:02 pm

Hi Golfox,

The SwingSmart release in the Google Play store and in the App Store has a face angle versus address number and if you tap it, it will provide your face angle versus your club path. Let us know if you like it as a toggle or if you would like to see it as a standalone.

Contact us anytime at [email protected]

All the Best,

The SwingSmart Team

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Ducky July 10, 2013 at 4:40 pm

Will any of these devices be able to provide feedback if the wrists are flat or cupped or bowed at the top? Have a problem with cupping and duck hooks. Not sure they go hand in hand, as I thought a cupped wrist induces a slice.

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Matt Saternus July 11, 2013 at 2:12 pm

Swing Byte and Swing Smart can show you the position of the club face at any point in your swing. From that, you could determine what position your wrist was in.

Best,

Matt

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Ariel July 11, 2013 at 3:25 am

I have the pro, and it is unfortunate that it was not included in this review. It was a gift from my parents and I do like it. It gives me what I need, especially with swingpath, love how it is displayed, very much like drawing with a light-saber…hehe. I wonder how it would’ve stacked up against these other devices. I also want to PUTT, but it is just a bit pricy and just like Matt said in the review, it only does half the job but the price is the same. If they would offer it in a bundle, then it would be really great.

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Stanley @3BaysGSA July 12, 2013 at 7:30 am

Hi Ariel,

We are more than happy to hear that you love the GSA PRO. We are working out some great deals with our retail partners, especially on GSA PUTT and bundle promotion. Stay close with us on Facebook & Twitter! ( Search “3BaysGSA” )

Thanks
Stanley @3BaysGSA

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Thomas July 11, 2013 at 4:03 am

Hi guys,

I want to get my son one of these analyzers for his birthday. I have no idea about these gadgets until I have read this, so thank you for this Matt. It is the off season in Australia at the moment, and I will be going back to Germany in Autumn. Therefore, I need an analyzer that he can practice his swing with, without actually hitting a ball. Can anyone make a suggestion?

Thank you

Thomas

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Matt Saternus July 11, 2013 at 2:13 pm

Thomas,

You can find the answers a little earlier in the comment section.

Best,

Matt

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Stanley @3BaysGSA July 12, 2013 at 7:48 am

Hi Thomas,

Our swing analyzer, 3BaysGSA PRO can capture data without making any contact. Simply perfect for indoor practice in off season and the swing analyzer also estimate the “Carry Distance” so that you can keep tracking the distance progress even at home.

Hope 3BaysGSA can be the birthday gift to your son.
Best
Stanley @3BaysGSA

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Armen July 11, 2013 at 4:24 am

Just saw Golf Sense and 3baysgsa at the apple store while waiting to get my iphone5 replaced. ( Yes, i’ve only had it for 2 months and its already having problems…………….) Anyway, just thought I share it after reading this post.

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Stanley @3BaysGSA July 12, 2013 at 7:36 am

Hi Armen,

Yup, 3BaysGSA products are now available at Apple Store ( both online and retail ) across the States and Canada. You can also have FREE SHIPPING if you purchase online now!

Search “3BaysGSA” on apple.com
Best
Stanley @3BaysGSA

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Ronald Gailun July 11, 2013 at 12:16 pm

Just wondering how these various devices will upgrade in the future………….inexpensive software downloads vs. new expensive hardware.

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Bobster July 11, 2013 at 3:00 pm

Outstanding reviews which I find to be very helpful. As with most of your readers we wish there had been a “clear cut winner”, but there seems to be enough information that we are not taking a stab in the dark. Thank you for taking the time and effort to do this. It is a credit to your professionalism. The manufacture representatives seem genuine also. A credit to the golf industry.

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Olivier July 12, 2013 at 2:56 pm

Great review Matt! My question is regarding the Skypro vs flightscope numbers could you please elaborate on the comparison between the two?

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Aaron July 13, 2013 at 3:26 pm

hi Matt thank you so much for your quick reply. I would love to ask you some follow up questions but don’t know how to find your email so I’m going to ask you on this forum. I am teaching myself and I’m about a3 handicap. I putt and chip really well obviously. sometimes my ball striking goes awry, probably more so to me overthinking than anything but I’m always looking to try and reach the next level…. so I understand track man data and how the new ball flight laws work. I guess I need a machine that will tell me clubface to path, path, Club facece impact, ball spin to maximize driver, launch angle,etc… I think track man gives all those how close are these cheers aaron

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clayton July 14, 2013 at 9:42 pm

Really great review, as always. I’ve been working with the Swingbyte2 for about a month now and couldn’t agree more with your assessment and grading. I knew I was slightly over the top with all my clubs and sure enough, the Swingbyte2 clearly shows it. When compared with the “Pro” swing examples, it’s a pretty glaring fault. The key, I believe, with all of these units is knowing what to do with the data it provides. If a picture is worth a thousand words, then so far, the swingbyte2 is priceless. The tempo feature is pretty neat, especially on the putter. Thanks for the great review.

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JimV July 25, 2013 at 10:50 am

Last Xmas I purchased a SwingTip for my son ( before your review ) and realize now it wasn’t the best choice. He is a scratch golfer, I’m a former scratch player who at 71 yrs has lost flexibilty and can only achieve barely a half swing, though I still can achieve good contact. When using his SwingTip it kept giving me a full swing, although correctly showing an out-to-in swing path-but I question the data? Which trainer’s do you believe would more accurately depict my short swing path and resulting data?

JimV

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sean August 7, 2013 at 2:14 pm

I have some questions about the golf sense which is odd as I don’t and never worn a glove

* like that it estimates distances but did i read somewhere it learns overtime ?
* really interested in the measurement of hip speed rotation [something i am trying to speed up ] but do you have any comparable’s
* one more question can you set the golf sense up as continuous
like to hit 5 balls then review

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sean August 8, 2013 at 7:49 am

GOLFSENSE

I have some questions about the golf sense which is odd as I don’t wear a glove

* I like that it estimates distances but how does it do this
when I de-loft my 8 iron into a 7 iron [usually by accident rather than design -)]
* I like that the golfsense attempts to measure hip speed rotation [something i am trying to speed up , so useful metric for me ] but do you have any comparable’s or benchmarks from the tour pros
* one more question can you set the golf sense up in a continuous mode
It would be easier to structure a practice session by hitting 5 balls
then reviewing

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GolfSense Jason August 10, 2013 at 12:11 am

Hi Sean,
Thanks for your questions regarding GolfSense. Our motion engine uses your club characteristics (shaft material, flex, loft, etc.) in conjunction with your swing data to predict ball flight. That said, there are many factors that come into play when it comes to actual distance. Course conditions, solidarity of ball contact, wind, and other factors all play a roll. So with that said, our distance projections are just that… projections.

The hip rotation feature is a very helpful and easy way to measure more of your body’s motion during your swing. We do have some recommended parameters for each level of player.

With respect to hitting balls in rapid succession, you can certainly do this. In fact you can keep hitting balls for hours and GolfSense will capture every swing and show each on screen in less than 2 seconds from impact.

If you have any questions or would like to talk with one of our PGA pros, please feel free to contact us at [email protected] and we’d be more than happy to answer any and every question for you.

Thank you again!

-Jason

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Sam August 21, 2013 at 1:20 pm

GolfSpy Matt, I am looking to buy one of these devices for my boyfriend and your reviews have been extremely helpful. He recently (a few months ago) began playing golf, and he has been getting private lessons. Which one of these devices do you feel would be best for a beginner? He is looking to improve his game, and I don’t believe he is familiar with the more professional trackers like TrackSmart that you have mentioned.

Again…best device for a beginner looking to improve his game without a million different numbers that could confuse; easy to use app with helpful graphics; could be used in conjunction with a trainer or by yourself. Thanks!

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Tom T August 21, 2013 at 6:34 pm

Matt, this side-by-side comparison is fantastic! I’ve been searching all over the web for reviews and comparisons that might give some insights into the relative merit/reliability of these devices. Your article hit 100% of what I was seeking and you have my thanks.

I’ve tried one of these devices and although the company’s support staff were great, in the end, I returned it. Just too erratic and variable with Android. Maybe some of those that originally launched with iPad platforms are reliable, but the Android catch-up efforts seem to generally fall short.

In any case, you have my thanks for a great article. I’m thinking that, for my needs and interest, the Golf Sense device may be best suited. I see it has a wrist-cock/release graphic, but I can’t really tell if it provides any club face or shaft angle data. Those would be very useful.

Thanks for the effort.

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Kevin Welc September 11, 2013 at 1:38 pm

All, Looking for a device that will tell me when I go back to far in the backswing, have a tendancy to take the club to far back, which device(s) would you recommend? Also, looking for help with mainly accuracy not distance at this time. Maybe tempo is my issue which is really fast with a high swing speed, handicap is 14.

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GolfSense Jason September 11, 2013 at 4:37 pm

Hi Kevin,
You can certainly use GolfSense to accurately measure your tempo, and backswing position for every swing. In our new app (released last week so after this review) you can now set specific goals for every parameter and GolfSense will tell you exactly what you’re doing well and where you need to improve. To address your specific questions, our new “focus screens” allow you to pick a single metric such as backswing position and work on it swing after swing, in rapid succession. The same is true for tempo. All of the the numbers are color coded towards YOUR GOALS: Green = good, Yellow = needs improvement, and Red = needs significant (work on this first).

To give you a better idea of how GolfSense could meet your specific needs check these links:
– (Blog post) Tempo http://zepp.com/the-lab/tempo-is-your-golf-swing-on-time/
– (Video) Backswing Position http://youtu.be/tJTdYN16Ws0
– (Video) GolfSense 3 App walkthrough http://youtu.be/cjpRDeC6ETA

**Note – While I’m of course biased towards GolfSense and our ability to meet your needs, hopefully you’ll find a system that works for you. If you have any other questions about our product, drills for improvement, or just want to chat about golf send us an email at [email protected]

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Stu September 18, 2013 at 9:30 pm

Matt,

For correcting an Over The Top (OTT) swing flaw can you say which device would be the best for addressing this specific problem?
Swingbyte 2.0 is the only device that has club path and face to path data based on your tables.

Can i assume the Swingbyte 2.0 would be the best device to assist me in eliminating my OTT swing?

Thanks,

Stu

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joe September 23, 2013 at 8:35 pm

please send any futher info.thank you for your great work.joe

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SwingSmart Angelo October 24, 2013 at 2:44 pm

Hi George,

Yes and Yes. The SwingSmart Duo that we introduced late this summer is compatible with both Android and iOS mobile devices.

The SwingSmart is very easy to use. It pairs quickly with your mobile device and then all you need to do is put it on the club, pick the club in the App that you are swinging, and tap the start button. From there, it will capture your swings.

We tried to keep the App screens very easy to move around so you can concentrate on your golf game.

If you have more questions about the SwingSmart, please email us anytime at [email protected].

All the Best,

Angelo

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Matt S November 5, 2013 at 3:16 pm

Great review from Matt, but still undecided on which to buy. I would like to know if any of the devices can:
A- Use a Bluetooth within my laptop to catch all data and display it?
OR
B- Once data is collected on Android phone , could it then be transferred to my laptop to display it ?
Look forward to replies, cheers, Matt.

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Alex (Swingbyte) November 5, 2013 at 5:17 pm

Hi Matt,

All swings captured with the Swingbyte Android or iOS apps automatically upload to the cloud, and can be reviewed from your computer (including fully interactive 3D and Video) on my.swingbyte.com

Best,
Alex.

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Matt S November 6, 2013 at 2:56 pm

Cheers Alex, had short listed them down to Swingbyte and Swingsmart, but I think this has just swayed my choice, cheers, Matt S

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Matt S November 10, 2013 at 5:33 pm

Hi Alex, I have had a look at the Swingbyte website, but cannot see how I could see the cloud. Please would it be possible to expand on your answer, cheers, Matt.

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Alex (Swingbyte) November 11, 2013 at 12:49 am

Sure Matt – just go to my.swingbyte.com once you’ve set up your free account, and all of your data will be available there.

Best,
Alex.

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Bernard November 10, 2013 at 7:49 pm

Regarding Swingbyte 2 review, it is now obvious that it wasn`t thoroughly tested.
All the literature states it is compatible with Android tablets, this is not the case.
Having read your review I was very impressed and decided to purchase one. Upon receiving the item I tried to find the free android app of Swingbyte 2, I couldn`t, only Swingbyte. Having investigated, this I find it dosen`t exist and they say it is still in the process of being finalized, which seems to be taking quite a while.
At this moment I have a piece of equipment that falls well short of expectations.
I can only add that in future all aspects of a product are tested to ascertain its efficacy.

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Alex (Swingbyte) November 11, 2013 at 12:48 am

Hi Bernard,

The Android app is very much available, and compatible with both Swingbyte and Swingbyte 2 – you can download it here:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.swingbyte2

If you’re referring to the 2.0 update of the app, that’s also available in beta form, please feel free to reach out to Swingbyte support to get your copy.

Hope this helps,
Alex.

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Bernard November 11, 2013 at 11:02 am

Hi Alex
This my final com. on this subject.
I have the Swingbyte 1 app installed, because that is all that is available for Androids.
I bought the SB2 because of the features it possessed and the fact all marketing says it is compatible with IOS and Androids with operating systems of Jellybean, Gingerbread and above.

A Beta version is not what I was expecting hear, as you know this implies it is still being assessed and may arrive with injurious programming, one never knows

Bernard

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Matt S November 24, 2013 at 4:50 pm

Hi Alex, have just ordered my swingbyte 2 from the U.S( I live in U.K) so it should be here soon. As you have probably noticed, I am not great with computers but I’m guessing beta is a trial version. Do you have any idea when the full version for Android will be available, or any future updates, many thanks, Matt.

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Alex (Swingbyte) November 25, 2013 at 11:40 am

Sounds great Matt! Beta just means that it’s something we’re continuing to improve more rapidly than a production version. We’re making it available to all users who want it (and have had great feedback thus far). The final version, as well as all future updates will be pushed out through Google play, and won’t require any additional work on your part.

Feel free to shoot swingbyte support a note and they’ll explain the beta process in more detail.

Best,
Alex.

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SteffanieSCarter December 4, 2013 at 1:16 pm

Not sure if I missed this question above^? Have you tested the 3Bay Swing? Seems like you only reviewed the Putt would limit versus the full swing apps?

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Mike Johnson December 4, 2013 at 3:43 pm

Hi Jason,

Can you please explain how the Golfsense measures hand plane and club plane differently? From my understanding, the sensor is only on the hand, leaving me mystified as to how a club plane measurement is generated. I see that both are measured in a percentage relative to how you started your backswing. This makes sense. However, most of your competitors have a component that is affixed to the shaft, not the hand, and don’t make a claim to follow the golfers hands. Your product seems to claim that it measures both despite only having one stationary point as well. Is the device just essentially making one reading and applying it to both categories? Is there really a time where your hand plane and swing plane would differ that dramatically? Can the Golfsense tell if you’re being too “wristy”? And if so, how would this appear in the data? Sorry for so many questions. I’m intrigured by the different figures that your product generates (considering I can’t understand a lot of the Trackman data in the first place), just looking for a little explanation as to how it’s conceived.

Thanks,
Mike

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GolfSense Jason December 5, 2013 at 1:03 am

Hi Mike,
Thank you for the questions. They’re good ones!

First let me explain what the plane percentages mean:
Imagine your backswing was contained in a single sheet of glass (aka “plane”). The same for your downswing. The closer these two sheets of glass get matched up (i.e. becoming a single sheet) the higher the percentage value. So a 100% number means that all of the positional data points tracking each phase of your swing are contained in the same plane. This is most commonly referred to as a “Single plane swing” and typically only applies to the club shaft. We’ve applied it to both shaft and hands. Note – I’m not suggesting that all players should have a single plane swing. I’m only pointing out the calculation method. This is important because we don’t feel that there is such a thing as a perfect swing. But there is such a thing as YOUR perfect swing. Our goal is for you to provide you actionable data and meaningful insight to discover what works best for you.

Now, let’s discuss the “how” aspects of your questions. We made a very conscious decision when developing GolfSense (and Zepp Golf) to do so on the hands. This was done for 3 reasons:
1) we believe that adding foreign objects to your club shaft can materially change your swing.

2) you have 2 fundamental connections in golf: feed to ground, and hands to club. For the most part, the club will go where the hands “tell” it to go. (generalizing but you get the point). The hands are critical!

3) ease of use! No need to detach and re-attach your sensor to each club during practice. Simply select your club in the app (2 taps), grab your desired club out of your bag and swing.

Ok, so how does GolfSense measure hand AND club data?
GolfSense has 2 accelerometers, and a 3-axis gyro that, when combined with our software, give us incredibly accurate data. Said simply, we know exactly what your hands are doing in multiple dimensions, acceleration, speed, trajectory, etc. When you set up your account in the apps you’ll add your clubs. We have a massive database with thousands of clubs in it so you can easily enter yours. Should your club not be in the database, you can add custom clubs. We use all of this data including club length, shaft material, flex patterns, clubhead weight, loft, etc. in our algorithm to calculate what’s happening at the club head and every data point in between. Note – we have a grip calibration process too that is calculated.

Now let me address your question regarding hand plane and club plane ( or club head) being different. We’ve studied 1000′s of swings from some of the best players in the history of the game. We went through an in depth video analysis of each players swing and plotted the hand path and club head paths. After doing this we saw some amazing differences and it’s something we call your “Swing Signature”. When you look at the hand paths relative to club paths of players like Tiger, Jim Furyk, Bobby Jones, Phil Mickelson, and more you’ll see wild differences. All amazing players. All different swings.

Using GolfSense you’ll be able to see big differences in your hand plane comparison and your club plane. In my own swing my hand plane values are very high (my hands move in the same plane during my backswing and downswing). But my club plane numbers are far less consistent. When I do get both values dialed I hit the ball much better.

So in the scenario outlined above, one key thing to work on is my wrists. The app won’t identify whether or not I’m “too wristy” but does identify that there’s a pretty big difference between what my hands are doing and what the end of the club is doing. Remember, your club will do what your hands are telling it to. There are many other reasons that could account for differences (elbows, take back angles, etc.) but having the data and a great visual in 3D of both your hands and club is really helpful.

Hopefully this helps. If you have more questions please feel free to post them here or send my team an email at [email protected] and we’ll jump on it. Even if you don’t decide to purchase GolfSense, we love “geeking it out” with folks .

-Jason

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Michael Johnson December 6, 2013 at 11:56 am

Hi Jason,

Thanks a ton. I appreciate such a thorough response. I just ordered the Golfsense as a gift for my dad. He’s got a pretty nasty slice, so I’m hoping this will help him visually understand that his swing plane is coming over the top time and time again. Myself, I am struggling with a bit of a chicken wing at the moment. Trying to concentrate on extending my arms and turning the wrists over more than I have in the past. I’ve found clearing the hips is helping me get my arms through much easier as well. Anyways, I’m sure you don’t care to hear about all of our swing foibles, but I appreciate your help. I’m sure we’ll both be very excited to use the Golfsense once it arrives.

Thanks again,
Mike

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GolfSense Jason December 6, 2013 at 1:07 pm
John December 10, 2013 at 11:53 am

My wife wants to take up the game now that we’re getting close to retirement , which one would be good for me who has golfed for years and her who is just learning? I’m a 18 handicap

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Moe December 13, 2013 at 9:31 pm

Have you tested the 3Bays GSA Pro yet? I am trying to decide between the SwingSmart and GSA Pro.

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Glenn January 3, 2014 at 10:07 pm

Jason
After reading your detailed response to Michael’s question regarding how your product is able to measure hand and club plane I went to your web site for additional information about Golfsense. Your web site offers another product called Zepp Golf and states it is an advanced version of golfsense offering a smaller lighter sensor with advanced processing power. Can you explain what is gained from the advanced processing power?
Regarding hip measurement is that relative to where your hands start at address ? If the hip rotation is measured from the hands starting point does the data show if your hips are starting in an open ,neutral or closed posture? If there is no neutral reference point wouldn’t that skew the results?

thanks
Glenn

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GolfSense Jason January 6, 2014 at 3:20 pm

Hi Glenn,
Our new Zepp Golf product contains more powerful sensors than our first generation GolfSense product. In addition to the hardware (sensors) improvements, the new Zepp Golf product captures approximately 10x the data points compared to GolfSense. This increase in data will allow us to provide more accurate swing analysis and some exciting new features in the future.

The hip rotation feature measures your hip movement during backswing and downswing to impact. We synchronize the data capture by using the sensor on your hand. Essentially, we consider your position at address as “neutral” for your starting value and then calculate rotational motion back and then forward to impact. We are currently not showing a measurement related to your initial stance (neutral, closed, open) as doing so accurately is quite difficult given varying differences in the phone location when sitting in your pocket.

Funny side note – If you’re wearing your tight hipster “skinny” jeans your hip rotation values may be more accurate then when wearing your MC Hammer baggies :-) . The more secure the phone is when in your pocket, the better the data.

If you use a phone holder or hip clip this can be very helpful too as it essentially “locks” the phone in place.

-Jason

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chris January 15, 2014 at 9:14 pm

Great review Matt – thank you. Is the android app for swingbyte2 available for the Microsoft surface2 pad ? I located it in the Google store but cannot download it. ? Just shows as add to wish list but no install button ?

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Chris January 16, 2014 at 9:18 am

Hi Matt great review. I have looked at the Swingbyte 2 and have a question for Alex. I have a Microsoft Surface2 android pad and have tried to download the software but the app allows me to save in a ‘wish list,’ but does not allow the download button to be visible. Does that mean it is not compatible with my pad ?
Secondly when is the new Swingbyte 2 app available for android platforms ? (can only see the old one in Google store).
Regards

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Alex (Swingbyte) January 16, 2014 at 11:46 am

Hi Chris – I’m not sure I follow the question. The Microsoft Surface runs Windows, not Android. You may be able to browse to the Google Play store online (and that’s probably why you’re seeing the Wishlist option), but you can’t install an Android app from it.

The updated Android app is in public beta right now, so if you have access to an Android tablet, just send support a note and we’ll send you a copy!

Thanks,
Alex.

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Chris January 16, 2014 at 4:44 pm

Thanks Alex – I had a senior moment there ! Forgot to engage brain . . . .

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Alex (Swingbyte) January 16, 2014 at 4:47 pm

No problem, happens to me more than I’d care to admit!

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JOn January 27, 2014 at 9:15 am

I am just about to give up on the Swingbyte2. Fantastic software but the hardware is not up to standard. First the silver clip fell apart and the plastic moulding that held it broke. Now the rubber to which the metal clip is attached split and the unit fell off when I was using it. I have treated the unit with exceptional gentleness since getting the replacement unit – not that I was clumsy with the first. My supplier has offered me a GSA pro as a replacement which I will take. Still think the Swingbyte is the better application but sadly it is unusable unless you can attach the unit to the club securely and it doesn’t fall apart.

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Alex (Swingbyte) January 27, 2014 at 3:07 pm

Jon,

Sorry to hear about the issues you’re having. This is definitely bad luck as we don’t see this pop up often. If you send a note to support, they’ll get you a replacement ASAP.

Thanks,
Alex.

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Steve February 1, 2014 at 6:22 pm

Question for Adam at SkyPro. Your web site shows that for checkpoints the face angle is shown at half-backswing and half-downswing. Curious why it is not shown at address, top of backswing, (and most importantly – at least I think so) at impact. Thanks

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Dave February 7, 2014 at 5:25 pm

Comment re swingbyte 2. I have experienced major issues getting it to record multiple swings. I basically have to restart the ap after every swing to get it to record another which is complete rubbish. I’m using it with an iPad 2 and suspect the ap is not up to scratch.

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Alex (Swingbyte) February 7, 2014 at 5:39 pm

Dave,

Swingbyte 2 produces a lot of data and the iPad 2 specifically (3 and up is fine) sometimes has an issue keeping up with it. There’s an easy setting change that can take care of it – please send a note to support and they’ll walk you through it.

Thanks,
Alex.

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Dave February 8, 2014 at 4:24 pm

Unfortunately Alex the support call has not recommended any setting changes nor has it produced any fix for the issue. If he here are settings that need to be made for specific devices, why are those not detailed either in the documentation supplied with the product, oh wait there wasn’t any, or on the website?
I stand by my initial comment that the app is not up to the task and I’m left with an expensive toys that doesn’t working as advertised.

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Dave February 10, 2014 at 3:19 pm

So,

For anyone considering one of these the support desk repsonse to the issue is include below, i.e. get a new device. The call is now flagged as resolved!

“Hi Dave,
Do you have a different mobile device you could try with your Swingbyte? That should get everything up and running for you.

Thanks again,”

My advice for what it’s worth, if you are thinking of buying one of these, and you have an older Ipad (like the iPad2) then think very carefully and try it first as there are clearly problems which they cannot resolve.

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Alex (Swingbyte) February 10, 2014 at 3:27 pm

Dave,

I’m sorry that you’re having an issue, and that specific support response is inaccurate. This is part of our normal testing to determine whether the issue is with your Swingbyte or your iPad2. It shouldn’t have been marked as resolved, and I’ll check to see why it was.

As I mentioned, we do see occasional issues with the iPad2 specifically, as it is a 3 year old tablet. 9 times out of 10 they’re related to other apps installed on the iPad running in the background.

I would appreciate it if you work with us to help troubleshoot this issue.

Thanks,
Alex.

NB February 11, 2014 at 4:29 pm

Hi Matt – Are there any plans to do a ’2014 Swing Trainer shootout’?

Thanks

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FM February 16, 2014 at 5:44 am

Hi,
Great review, thank you.
Can I ask if any of these are looking at adding a facility to link the data to video capture of the golfer being tracked?
I’d also love to see an up to shootout considering it seems the majority of these products have changed.

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Alex (Swingbyte) February 17, 2014 at 12:56 pm

Hi FM,

Swingbyte apps have that ability – record and synchronize video with your swing, and see what the body is doing at the same time as the club.

Feel free to contact Swingbyte support if you have any questions.

Thanks,
Alex.

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olav February 19, 2014 at 4:04 pm

Time to consider a windows app? Some of the best devices out there are windows based. Is there a 2014 test in the works?

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Ricky February 19, 2014 at 6:53 pm

Matt,
Great article. It’s very difficult to chose which device works best. I’ve gone back and forth on which one to buy. I like the Swing Smart but can’t justify the greater price. I’m a numbers guy so I’ll probably get a Swing Byte. An annoying factor for the top 3 products(SS,SB, and SP) is none of them publish a phone number on their website. I’ve emailed them and was provided a number. So it seems like none of them realize the importance of direct customer contact or support. I want to be able to talk to a human especially if I’m having problems. If you don’t make it easy for me to talk to you before I buy your product I have no faith that you’ll be any more accessible or supportive afterwards.

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Alex (Swingbyte) February 20, 2014 at 12:11 pm

Ricky – the reason we don’t publish a phone number is that it’s much easier for us to track incoming requests when they come in by email. Our support staff is awesome, and even though we guarantee a one-day turnaround, we typically respond within an hour or so.

Thanks,
Alex.

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Ricky June 16, 2014 at 6:46 pm

Just an update … I bought the Swing Byte. I was excited about being able to analyze my own swing. I paired it with an Iphone 5. The device or the software would just shut down and record no swings. I reloaded the software and it worked some what better. The real issue was the device would not stay in place on my club. I used it on several different clubs … same issue … Hit 2 or 3 balls and then the device moves … I’d have to stop and reposition it. It would seem to me job number ONE it to make sure you gizmo stays in place on the shaft. This one doesn’t. … I returned mine and spent the money on lessons.

And in response Alex on not providing a phone number so YOU can track calls or emails better still misses the issue of being as available as possible to the customer. I don’t care about you tracking emails or customer issues. When I’m looking at spending a couple of hundred dollars on a new golf toy I want to pick up a phone and get an answer … right now not in an hour.

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DI February 21, 2014 at 11:42 am

I have discussed these technologies with my Golftec instructor. He has not offered an endorsement of any of them. I take regular lessons (rebuilding my game after surgery) and would like a technology to support practice when I’m not at the Golftec location (it’s a long way away). I come away from each lesson with goals to achieve relative to club swing path, face to path angles, etc. I would buy any of these that would be best at accurately measuring the things I need to practice, I could even set it at the lesson if it holds over time between sessions. What one should I buy.

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Angelo February 22, 2014 at 12:58 pm

Hi DI,

Thank you for checking out the review. Each of the swing trainers featured in the review has taken their own approach to their product. We developed the SwingSmart because of our own frustrations with learning the game of golf and then sought out top teachers, including a great coach and analyst like Peter Kostis to learn how golf is taught at all levels of the game. We then took this knowledge and designed the technology around it. So we knew that the SwingSmart had to work with every club in your bag because you use every club in your bag. (Unless of course you are Tin Cup, then you only use the 7 iron.) We also set up a unique Training Mode feature so you could work on your swing shape without the pressure of trying to hit a perfect shot while you learn. Along with all the numbers:Tempo, Face Angle, Path, Swing Speed, and Angle of Attack we made sure our 3D shows the movement of the club so you can see every hitch, hit, or pause in your club during the swing. This is so important when you putt because the little manipulations of the putter kills your consistency. If you would like to continue the discussion about our product or using swing trainers in general to help you train, please email us at [email protected].

All the Best,

Angelo (SwingSmart)

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John O March 30, 2014 at 9:14 am

Great review. But a device can’t NOT have the Path Angle. That is vital. That’s what we’re all trying to straighten out.
I researched these late last year and went with SwingByte 2. It has all the vital data in degrees (not just “inside”/”outside” or arrows), was the only one with Angle of Attack, works for swinging and putting, works on iPhone and Android, has a new beautiful iphone app, but best of all an even better iPad app. None of the others had iPad. It’s like having a TV monitor in front of you at the range. Or you can video yourself and it syncs its swing graphics and data with the video. 4,700 swings later and now I have a much straighter more consistent swing.
SkyPro was second with its extra backswing and downswing data points, but had no putting or iPad app (or Andoid).

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JJ April 5, 2014 at 3:41 am

Which one of these devices is smart enough to have blackberry compatibility? For those that dont, you are literally telling hundreds/thousands of people who could have otherwise been customers that you do not want them as customers. I understand that it takes your development team more time to code/program the hardware for different mobile operating systems, but its just not a wise business decision to send the message to tons of potential customers that you do not wish to do business with anyone without an iphone (mostly kids anyways) or an android device. All that said, good job to the developers for answering questions here. If there are any that are wise enough to support blackberry, please let us know here. I for one will likely be purchasing from the first to do so. Thanks in advance!

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The Grint May 5, 2014 at 8:43 am

No doubt iphone store is the best place to get high rating apps.. I am operating I phone 5 and i love this phone because its play all apps.

Apps like games, education or our daily use. recently i download Golf Handicap Tracker because i love to play Golf.. and its running awesome.

Guys Try this App.

Download this from iphone store or get iphone store download link from http://www.thegrint.com

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Robert May 15, 2014 at 4:47 pm

Hi Matt,

great review Are you planning an update about the swing trainers??

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Bob S May 16, 2014 at 8:39 am

I have tried (note tried) using my SwingSmart Duo 4 times now. Out of 300 range balls, I have been able to get the device to recognize only 37 swings. Each time out it will work for about 10 swings and then all of a sudden it stops recognizing the device. My first night out with it was a disaster, none of the swings were recognized. I’m not sure any of the advertised devices would be any better because comments I have read on each of them say pretty much what I am providing. I will say the 37 swings it has recorded have been helpful and using the video replay I was able to stop the swing at various points along my line and pick up some of my mistakes, but that is the only bright spot. Extremely unhappy because when this device works, it appears it could be revolutionary in helping someone with swing problems. I recommend you think twice before buying this product.

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Angelo May 16, 2014 at 2:23 pm

Hi Bob,

I’m sorry that the SwingSmart is not recognizing all your swings. I just sent you a few suggestions to your email that will help with the capture issue. We can also setup a quick call so we can get you up and running and getting back to working on your golf game.

Thank you,

Angelo

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FM May 16, 2014 at 2:45 pm

I ended up buying the Zepp golf and the swingsmart duo but I’m not convinced with the results as they seem to contradict each other. The other weird thing I find is I can hit an absolute stinker but it still records as a good shot!

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Angelo May 16, 2014 at 4:59 pm
Jeff sollenberger June 15, 2014 at 9:16 pm

Which devices/ apps can also sync with video? This is a good article but an update would be great.

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Alex (Swingbyte) June 16, 2014 at 6:52 pm

Hi Jeff,

Swingbyte lets you use the camera built into your phone or tablet to record video, automatically trim each clip to just your swing, and on tablets – play it back in unison with the 3d, so you can see both what the body is doing in the video and the club in the 3d.

Best,
Alex.

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Jay June 18, 2014 at 1:38 pm

Matt – I have a swing plane issue – which device is best?

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GolfSense Jason June 18, 2014 at 2:03 pm

Hi Jay,
At the risk of coming across as “pushing you a product”, I’ll offer the following video library on GolfSense / Zepp Golf: http://www.zepp.com/golfvideos/

We spend a lot of time on club and hand path at Zepp. We recently updated the Zepp Golf app to show (very easily) whether you are over or under plane.

Club Plane in Zepp: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W0VYotaBleI

Hand Plane in Zepp: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6FpGCrSFSA

Hopefully you’ll find the info informative and help you in your overall decision. Let me know if I can provide any additional information.

-Jason

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Bob M July 14, 2014 at 3:35 pm

Best for playing actual golf, doesn’t this point to GolfSense? I mean, you can either have your sensor on your glove, or you can attach a sensor to a shaft each time you pick up a different club. Sounds like the Zepp Golf product is the Cheeto in your collection of Cortlands, Granny Smiths, and Galas. I love apples, but I really love Cheetos.

I really want a product that I can just wear and not worry about last-second club changes on the course. Is the GolfSense the only product of that type?

Regards,
Bob M

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Jim September 21, 2014 at 1:03 am

Which ones show distance in yardages and ball flight with their data?
Also does Swingsmart or Golfsense store swings in the clouds only, if so does that mean a person cannot review their swings instantly unless in a wifii or data reception zone?

-Great article thanks guys

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GolfSense Jason September 21, 2014 at 7:55 pm

GolfSense (and Zepp Golf) store your swings on your local device as well as in the cloud. You do not need a data connection (3G or Wifi) to see your swings instantly. You will need a data connection to sync your swings to the cloud so that they can be viewed on additional devices.

Calculating actual distance is very challenging for any of these devices since they can’t actually track ball flight, course conditions, weather etc. Some of them show projected distance however I don’t think this measurement is where this category of sensor technology is most helpful. Should you have any questions regarding GolfSense or Zepp Golf please feel free to contact us at ANY time: [email protected]

-Jason
CEO | Zepp Labs, Inc.

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